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Type 1 adapter

Discussion in 'General Charging Discussion' started by Nihad jaleel, Jan 8, 2017.

  1. Nihad jaleel

    Nihad jaleel Active Member

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    I'm getting a 32 amp adapter for my new leaf charging at home. I have a tethered Zoe charger now. Zoe being sold. Can I use this Adapter at a rapid charger without burning it down? Will the charge sense it's not a Zoe and stop charging? Anybody tried this...?
     
    Electric Van Man likes this.
  2. smartie

    smartie Well-Known Member

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    Why would you want to do this even if it works instead of just using the Chademo on the rapid charger and charging rapidly?
     
  3. arg

    arg Well-Known Member Speak EV Supporter

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    That is the combination where these not-permitted-by-standards adapters are potentially dangerous. The chargepoint will continue offering 63A to the car, unaware that there's a 32A-rated adapter in the circuit.

    Fortunately in your case the Leaf is limited to 30A(?), so it won't in fact melt.
     
  4. Nihad jaleel

    Nihad jaleel Active Member

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    What if it's not working or occupied by another leaf?
     
  5. Nihad jaleel

    Nihad jaleel Active Member

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    Sorry I meant the normal rapid charger used for my Zoe motorway stations.it shudnt offer a different amp?
     
  6. arg

    arg Well-Known Member Speak EV Supporter

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    The general way this works at all chargepoints is that the chargepoint tells the car ("offers") the maximum current it has available, and the car then decides how much of that it wants to use.

    If the chargepoint has a socket rather than a tethered cable, then the plug on the end of the cable contains a resistor that tells the chargepoint what the rating of the cabe is (16A, 32A or whatever) and the chargepoint will reduce its offer if necessary so that it never offers more than the cable can handle, nor any more than the chargepoint can handle internally. For a chargepoint with a built-in (tethered) cable, the chargepoint already knows what the rating of the cable is as part of the manufacturing or installation process.

    So with these standard components, any combination of parts that you can plug together is safe - if you use the wrong cable it may charge slower than you would like, but nothing will overheat. The plugs are carefully designed so that if you try to use two cables plugged together as an extension it won't work at all.

    Your type2-type1 adapter cable isn't a configuration permitted by the standards, as it bypasses the protection- with your adapter on the end of the cable, neither the chargepoint nor the car has any way of knowing what the rating of the adapter is (or even that you are using an adapter at all) and the chargepoint will offer its full power to the car.

    In the case of rapid chargepoints such as seen at motorway service areas, these are normally capable of 63A and so will offer that to the car, not knowing that you are using an adapter. In the case of your car and your adapter, it happens to be OK: the chargepoint will offer 63A but the Leaf can only use 30A and the adapter won't be overloaded. If you loaned your adapter to another driver with a car that can use more than 32A (a Tesla Roadster perhaps), it will draw the full 63A through the adapter and overload it.

    Likewise, when used at home the adapter's rating (presumably) matches that of your chargepoint, so won't in fact be overloaded.

    These unofficial adapters also have theoretical issues with rain penetration, in that the connectors aren't designed to be used in this way, though it may in fact work OK in practice.

    Finally, the adapters generally available don't lock the connector during charging (as is done by a socketed chargepoint to a detachable cable), so there is the possibility of unplugging the adapter while a heavy current is flowing and so causing arcing at the contacts. Other features of the system will cut off the power immediately afterward, so it's not a huge issue, but it's another safety mechanism bypassed by the adapter.


    Overall, for your particular use, the adapter isn't particularly hazardous, but it has bypassed several of the safety features of the system and should be used with care.
     
  7. Electric Van Man

    Electric Van Man Active Member

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    Yes it's easy to make one.
    I did mine when I had a Renault Fluence ZE as you could not use the rapid chargers without it.
    My lead is a 32amp, but it will work with a 16amp also.

    All you have to do is cut off 17mm of the plug and this will then fit into your teathered type 2 lead or at the Rapids.
    Some people ask why even have this if your Vehicke has a Chademo socket. I have the ENV200.
    But sometimes the rapid Chademo is down. This lead give you a back up option.
    It's better to have a small charge to get you home then nothing at all.

    Please see attached pictures.
    image.jpeg
     

    Attached Files:

  8. smartie

    smartie Well-Known Member

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    If the Chademo on the same charger is being used then the Type 2 charger will not be available to use either. All Ecotricity rapid chargers have a Chademo on them.
     
    Simon Hewison likes this.
  9. Jack

    Jack Moderator

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    Adapters should not be used full stop, if it was a good idea they would be part of the spec.

    You burn yourself down, or damage your car through over voltage or similar - warranties/insurance voided game over.
     
  10. Electric Van Man

    Electric Van Man Active Member

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    Only one vehicle can charge at one time on a rapid charger
     
  11. Electric Van Man

    Electric Van Man Active Member

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    They are fine and are readily available from a number of EV cable stockists
     
  12. Jack

    Jack Moderator

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    They are not "fine", they are specifically prohibited by the spec and all the connectors are designed to be non-extendable.

    I would consider anybody who sells these adapters to be disreputable.
     
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  13. Electric Van Man

    Electric Van Man Active Member

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    I am sorry these are all readily available, I have a 25 meter extension 32amp lead so I can use dealership forecourts when they are closed. this was all purchased on line and is available now Please have a look yourself.
    They all hold the British safety kite mark.
     
  14. Jack

    Jack Moderator

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    And so do many things sold on Alibaba, its exactly the same thing.

    These items individually might hold a QC mark, but made up into an extension which is specifically disallowed by the cable specification means the individual marks count for nothing.

    The vendor is specifically ignoring the safety mechanism of the IEC 62196.

    Furthermore, the shortened type-2 connector in your picture has fake QC markings, shortening in that way is not part of the spec, and specifically designed against.
     
  15. Electric Van Man

    Electric Van Man Active Member

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    I have attached some pictures to show you what you can purchase.
    All of these I highly recommend
    LEAD 1.JPG chc015-11-600.jpg chc011-08a-600.jpg t1-extension-600l.jpg .
     
  16. Electric Van Man

    Electric Van Man Active Member

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    These are readily available from a number of different EV cable companies
     
  17. Jack

    Jack Moderator

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    Readily Available != Standards Compliant.
     
  18. Electric Van Man

    Electric Van Man Active Member

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    FAKE markings?

    REALLY????????
     
  19. Jack

    Jack Moderator

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    I guarantee it, reputable OEMs would not risk their reputation and license to manufacture non-approved connectors.

    It has IEC62196-2 mark, which is impossible given its outside of standard.
     
  20. donald

    donald Well-Known Member

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    I have raised this issue and someone said that these leads had been tested.

    Really? Well, OK, but I can't see a bulkhead socket not fitted to a bulkhead (per that lead), sitting in a puddle of rain, passing any test I can imagine.
     
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